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Your Vagina Is Ageing: A Timeline Of Changes Down There, From Your 30s To Your 60s

Woman &home.com by Kelly Allen on Friday, 17 June 2017

It's not just your face that can give your age away, your vagina is getting older too. While you might pore over the lines and wrinkles on your forehead in the mirror every morning, it's less likely you are looking 'down there'. However, just like the rest of your body, it's going through the ageing process. How does a normal vagina age?

Every woman and every vagina is different, and it's completely understandable to wonder, 'is my vagina normal?'. But a healthy vagina will continue to change as we go through life - this is totally normal. Key life transitions such as pregnancy and menopause will have an effect on your genitals, just as they do on the rest of your body. Read on to discover how a normal vagina changes with age...

In your 30s

If you are on the pill, or have taken it previously, your vagina may become drier in your thirties - experts believe that because the pill stops ovulation, you might not produce as much natural lubrication at this time of the month.
Stephanie S Fabuion, author of Mayo Clinic- The Menopause Solution says, "We think some women may get more vulvar dryness with birth control pills because the pills are blocking male sex hormones called androgens, and the vulva has androgen receptors." However, she does add that this varies from woman to woman.

Pregnancy and childbirth can also have a massive impact on your vagina, as well as your vulva.

The uterus swells to watermelon proportions during pregnancy - some women even get varicose veins on their genitals thanks to this increase in weight.

Hormones produced when you are expecting can also change the colour of your vulva, making it darker.

Thankfully, the vagina is an extremely resilient part of your body and, thanks to its elasticity and blood supply, a healthy vagina tends to return to normal within six weeks of childbirth.

However, doctors recommend performing pelvic floor exercises to help things since the force applied to our pelvic muscles during labour can cause damage. Doing regular Kegels when expecting will help to prevent bladder leakage and can help make sex feel more like before.


In your 40s

Years of defuzzing may start to take their toll now - you might notice skin or pigment changes as a result of waxing or shaving down there. Just like the hair on your head, your pubic hair will also start to thin in your forties. This is thought to be down to declining oestrogen.
Aside from pregnancy-related changes, a healthy vagina will remain largely unchanged until you reach your forties. However, during this decade, your hormone levels begin to decline as perimenopause beckons. At this point, you may start to notice reductions in elasticity, thinning vaginal walls and the beginnings of vaginal dryness, which can result in itching, burning and redness.


In your 50s

Most women go through the menopause between the ages of 50 and 52 - this will have an enormous impact on a normal vagina.

Depleted oestrogen levels result in thinner, less elastic and drier vulvular tissue due to loss of fat and collagen. This can cause irritation during sex - compared by some people to using sandpaper or feeling like you need to go to the toilet.

As hormone levels drop, your body stops making certain bacteria - this will changes the pH level of a normal vagina, making it more acidic. In the absence of this good bacteria, you will be more prone to infections like urinary tract infections and bacterial vaginosis, as well as STIs.



In your 60s and beyond

Whilst other symptoms of the menopause will gradually tail off, changes to your vagina will continue on into your 60s. By the age of 60, nearly 60 per cent of women experience problems with vaginal dryness.

This can cause problems for your sex life. Faubion explains: "When sex hurts for women after menopause, there's this involuntary reaction. You anticipate having painful sex, and then your pelvic floor muscles spasm to protect you. Your brain is saying, 'This is going to hurt'."

What can you do to help your vagina as it ages?

If you have concerns about your vagina or feel physically uncomfortable, it's important to seek medical attention, whatever your age. However, remember that a healthy vagina will still undergo changes. Try these self-help tips to keep yours feeling fresh...
1. Doing Kegels can help to keep symptoms at bay. Contract your pelvic floor muscles (the ones you squeeze to stop the flow of urine when you go to the toilet) for ten seconds, relax, and repeat 20 times, three times a day.

2. Ditch your office chair - instead, sit on a Swiss ball for 15 minutes a day. This forces
the muscles of your pelvic floor to contract - and you won't need to do a single
squeeze.

3. If your problems revolve around dryness during sex then a lubricant can make things easier - just remember not to use oil-based lubricants with condoms.


Read more at http://www.womanandhome.com/diet-and-health/539881/your-vagina-is-ageing-a-timeline-of-changes-down-there




News. The NHS are encouraging all men to masturbate.

The NHS is encouraging men to masturbate after a study concluded ejaculating at least 21 times a month could reduce their risk of developing the most common form of cancer.

The peer-reviewed findings, published in the journal European Urology, were the result of researchers from Harvard and Boston medical schools and universities studying 31,925 healthy men, who completed a questionnaire about their ejaculation frequency back in 1992.

These same men, who were aged 20-to-29, 40-to-49, were monitored until 2010 and during that time 3,839 of them were diagnosed with prostate cancer.

The findings, being widely reported this week, compare the 21-timers with men who ejaculate just four-to-seven times every four weeks.


The researchers found that the risk of prostate cancer in men aged between 20 and 29 and 40 and 49 was significantly reduced if they ejaculated at least 21 times a month, whether through sex or masturbation.

This was compared with men who ejaculated just four-to-seven times a month. NHS says masturbation can help ward off cancer in men
By WMN_PGoodwin | Posted: July 08, 2017



Health bosses are urging men to practice self love

The NHS is encouraging men to masturbate after a study concluded ejaculating at least 21 times a month could reduce their risk of developing the most common form of cancer.

The peer-reviewed findings, published in the journal European Urology, were the result of researchers from Harvard and Boston medical schools and universities studying 31,925 healthy men, who completed a questionnaire about their ejaculation frequency back in 1992.

These same men, who were aged 20-to-29, 40-to-49, were monitored until 2010 and during that time 3,839 of them were diagnosed with prostate cancer.

The findings, being widely reported this week, compare the 21-timers with men who ejaculate just four-to-seven times every four weeks.


The researchers found that the risk of prostate cancer in men aged between 20 and 29 and 40 and 49 was significantly reduced if they ejaculated at least 21 times a month, whether through sex or masturbation.

This was compared with men who ejaculated just four-to-seven times a month.


The NHS says prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK, with over 40,000 new cases diagnosed every year.

However, the researchers are not speculating on the reasons why ejaculating reduces the risk of prostate cancer. It is being reported that previous research hints at the possibility that ejaculation contributes to getting rid of cancer-causing elements and infections from the gland.

Inflammation is a known cause of cancer, and ejaculation may help to ease this.

They wrote: "We found that men reporting higher compared to lower ejaculatory frequency in adulthood were less likely to be subsequently diagnosed with prostate cancer."

The study has been featured on the NHS website, which notes a range of other factors - such as genetics, lifestyle, number of children, diet, nature of sexual activity and education - may also contribute to prostate cancer risk.

However the NHS website also says: "Despite any lurid tales you may have heard growing up, masturbation is entirely safe.

"So if you want to do it as a preventative method, then it wouldn't pose any health risks."

Initial signs of prostate cancer usually involve problems with urination, such as needing to urinate more frequently, due to the prostate getting larger. While prostate enlargement can occur as men grow older, it is important to check symptoms like these with your GP.

Prostate cancer facts
From the NHS website

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK, with over 40,000 new cases diagnosed every year.
It usually develops slowly, so there may be no signs you have it for many years.
Symptoms often only become apparent when the prostate is large enough to affect the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the penis).When this happens, men may notice things like an increased need to urinate, straining while urinating and a feeling that your bladder has not fully emptied.T
These symptoms shouldn't be ignored, but they do not mean you definitely have prostate cancer. It is more likely that they are caused by something else, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (also known as BPH or prostate enlargement).

Taken from devonlive.com 08.07.17




Read more at http://www.devonlive.com/nhs-says-masturbation-can-help-ward-off-cancer-in-men/story-30430276-detail/story.html#AqJEJWXpMw8jSZ0B.99


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